Seeing in a New Light

Note: This article was first published by, and for, Social Entrepreneurship Forum: http://www.seforum.sg.

You enter fearless, with seven others, confident that darkness alone poses little threat and challenge. As you venture deeper into the exhibition, with only a white cane and a gentle voice guiding you to “come towards my voice”, new thoughts surface: Is this what it truly feels like to be blind? Can I truly experience the world without sight?
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Securing the Future of Asia’s Food

Note: This article was first published by, and for, Social Entrepreneurship Forum: http://www.seforum.sg.

Think of “Food” and “Asia” and what comes to mind is a rich and diverse mosaic of landscapes and sentiments: on the one hand, we can imagine golden fields of rice tended by tight-knit communities, abundant harvests at year-end festivals, and sprawling, animated markets; however, we also have unsavory images of grain rotting in the heat, poverty-stricken and hungry children, and food riots in urban centers.

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Is Singapore Hungry? – A Project Perk Discussion

Written for The Kent Ridge Common

Hunger in Singapore was the red-hot issue at the very first Project Perk discussion, organized by the Democratic Socialist Club at the Central Library’s Perk Point. The session was moderated by Ms. Heather Chi, a local food activist from youth group Food for All and was attended by some fifteen undergraduates from different walks of life. Continue reading

The Food Professionals’ Dilemma

Written for The Kent Ridge Common

The global food industry has been the subject of intense scrutiny – and criticism – over the past year from actors as diverse as journalist Michael Pollan, environmentalist Vandana Shiva, and Prince Charles of Britain.

Their main contentions: the unsustainable mass production (and waste) of cheap food; the harmful health effects ofagrochemicals, global inequities in food distribution, resulting in famines; inadequate food safety regulations; farm land grabsby richer nations; and the questionable practice patenting Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) by large multi-national companies that both exploit communities and damage the environment. With the recent death of Norman Borlaug, father of the first Green Revolution, the debate about how to produce, distribute and consume food fairly and sustainably for a world of eight billion has reached a peak. Continue reading